Tag: equity

Training and Maintaining Alternate Protocol for Gifted ID

Announcing the December 2017 alternate protocol training for identifying gifted students in New Mexico. Access the tools you need to identify high academic potential among diverse gifted learners in your schools. Continue reading



Get Ready for NMAG’s 13th Annual Fall Gifted Institute

The conference is just around the corner and NMAG is ready for New Mexico’s teachers, administrators and parents. Are you interested in learning about and advocating for gifted education?

Big Top Conference Poster 2017

Click to download the poster for printing and sharing.

Under the Big Top

Come see the greatest show on gifted!

October 20-21, 2017

New Mexico Highlands Rio Rancho Center

1700 Grande Blvd SE #100, Rio Rancho, NM 87124

Keynote Speaker: Jaime Castellano

Our keynote speaker this year will be Dr. Jaime A. Castellano, one of the nation’s leading authorities on the identification, assessment, recruitment, and retention of low-income, culturally and linguistically different gifted students. Dr. Castellano has particular expertise and success in working with school districts across the nation to increase the number of Hispanic/Latino students, Native American students, as well as English language learners in gifted education programs.

Castellano is an award-winning principal and author, as well as a noted researcher and scholar in gifted education. He has written and edited four books on understanding our most able students from diverse backgrounds, written and/or edited multiple chapters, articles, and monographs in the field. His 2011 publication: Special Populations in Gifted Education: Understanding Our Most Able Students from Diverse Backgrounds was awarded the Legacy Award for Outstanding Scholarly Publication in the field of Gifted Education. He also serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Advanced Academics (JAA), Journal for the Education of the Gifted (JEG), Gifted Child Today (GCT), and Roeper Review. Continue reading



Funding Gifted in Tight Times

As the legislature convenes in special session and school districts across New Mexico build budgets for funding the 2017-2018 school year, the New Mexico Association for Gifted would like to highlight the need for a range of quality gifted education programming in our state.

A wide range of needs

New Mexico’s student population contains a wide range of gifted students – children of immigrants, research scientists (and immigrant research scientists!), artists, farmers; speakers of Spanish and English, Navajo and Tagalog; students whose lives outside of school are incredibly enriched in ways that support school learning, as well as those who care for siblings instead of doing homework, so that their parents can work multiple jobs.

At current funding levels, schools across New Mexico struggle to identify giftedness with equity and serving the wide range of needs. Yet, thanks to the promises made in Individual Education Plans, our gifted students may receive a range of services to meet their needs, including small group services that help students who will be the first generation in their family to attend college, whole-day programming for the highly gifted, acceleration in talent areas, and special thinking skills instruction. Continue reading



Press Release from Santa Fe: Equitable ID and Services

We’ve decided to repost this press release from SFPS as a clear articulation of a vision that aligns well with our association’s vision for education in New Mexico. This is also a pivotal theme of our October 14 & 15, 2016 Institute for Gifted Education.

Santa Fe Schools Improve Equity in Gifted Education

June 14, 2016, Santa Fe, NM

Santa Fe Public Schools, building on its commitments to diversity and world-class schools, has embarked on a multi-year mission to increase the identification and improve services to gifted students through its new program of Services for Advanced and Gifted Education. By identifying and removing barriers to participation, SFPS SAGE has started on a path to establish strong gifted programs across all schools, including students from every background.

Giftedness, according to the National Association for Gifted Children, is defined as high performance or potential in about the top 10% of a field or domain.   The State of New Mexico provides supplemental funding to support services for a portion of the intellectually gifted, around 3-7% of the total school population.  To maintain motivation, growth in skill and knowledge, and interested in school, these students generally require more advanced curriculum than their grade level provides.  In addition, some subgroups of gifted students, such as those with extremely high levels of ability, specific learning challenges, or those who will be in their family’s first generation to attend college, may need special services to help develop potentials into results.

In past years, gifted students have been found in Santa Fe schools using a series of IQ, achievement, and thinking skill tests that were administered when a parent or teacher felt very strongly that a student may be gifted. While the tests measure a broad range of abilities associated with good educational and life outcomes, and are highly reliable, this system failed to identify many of our gifted students.

Why? IQ scores and the likelihood of a student being nominated for testing are both influenced by students’ previous opportunities. Students who are culturally different, linguistically diverse, or economically disadvantaged are underrepresented in gifted programs across the United States, since they are less likely to get referred for testing in the first place and, if tested, are on average less prepared to score well on the tests.

To reduce this inequity, Santa Fe School’s SAGE program has trained teachers to better recognize characteristics of giftedness, and in addition to teacher and parent nominations, mined achievement test scores to find and automatically refer high-performing students.  Improving equity in testing, SAGE is using tests that can be delivered in Spanish as well as English, and compares each student to others with similar previous opportunities.  More than 800 students, or about 1/20 Santa Fe public school students, were tested this past school year. Continue reading